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Never Again Thundereggs
Never Again Mine, Florida Mtns, Luna Co., New Mexico

pic   There is an amusing story behind the Never Again Mine discovered and opened by Paul "GeodeKid" Calburn. The mine is known for its very large thundereggs and it happens to be located on the western steep part of the Little Florida Mountains (just south of Rockhound State Park). So the first trek to the mine proved to be very difficult for Paul Calhoun and it's even harder for him to bring the thundereggs down to his truck that he had to let some roll down the slope. Too many of them ended up in the patches of picky pear cactus and a really big one barely missed his truck.  When he finally finished his first digging trek, he shouted "Never Again!" and that's how the mine got its name, and after seeing what he cut, he kept coming back to that mine several times until he became too old to climb the slope.
     It was very tiring trek even for me to climb to the mine and I can bring down only 15-25 pounds of thundereggs so not to be hard on my back while doing down the slope. What makes it worth to go back to that mine? The mine is one of few places in the world where the "Tillage Agates" can be found which refers to the fact the horizontal bands are not parallel to each other as a result of its formation being interrupted by tectonic activities (faulting) making it an excellent tool in geological studies. Most thundereggs are hollow and lined with chalcedony and some are filled with solid white to gray agates (rarely colorful opal) have been found. Large and impressive thundereggs can been found there. It's possible to find some more there but it takes a lot of work to chisel the pertile matrix away and find good ones among many duds.

Site Status: As of Jan 2022, The site is ujnder a new claim so please don't trespass.
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Rough Appearance: Brown thundereggs caked with orange to yellowish tan weathered pertile/tuff.
Tend to be hollow with white opal layers at the bottom, agate are typically clear sometimes with some blue to black tints.


YOU CAN CLICK ON THE PICTURES TO SEE LARGER PICTURES
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Star-like cavity
Typical opal-filled
March 2007
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Rare 3-event "Tillage Agate"
 March 2006
Ideal "Tillage Agate" with calcite psuedomoprh
March 2007
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Rare colored opal band
March 2008
Shadowing Agate in the center
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Classic example of "Tillage Agate"
Marked by Paul "GeodeKid" Calburn
Classic example of "Tillage Agate"
Marked by Paul "GeodeKid" Calburn
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Banded agate and agate bands

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